Mosquito-Smart Travel Tips

Overview

Mosquito-Smart Travel Tips

Even when the risk of mosquito-borne illness is low here in San Mateo County, you may be at higher risk if you travel to other areas of the state, country, or world. If you’re infected with a mosquito-borne illness while traveling, there is a risk you could pass it on to local mosquitoes once you return home, and a local outbreak could occur. These tips will help you protect yourself and others from mosquito-borne illnesses during and after travel.

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Get Prepared for Travel
Step 1

You bought your plane tickets, booked your flights, and packed your suitcase. But did you prepare for the risks of mosquito-borne illnesses at your destination?

Before you travel to areas with active transmission of mosquito-borne illnesses, talk to your healthcare provider to see if there’s anything you should do to protect your health. You can also visit the CDC’s travel health website (https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel) to see whether there are any advisories for your destination.

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Stay Healthy During Your Trip
Step 2

When spending time in areas where there is active transmission of a mosquito-borne disease, you should take precautions against mosquito bites. Many of these precautions are the same ones you’d take at home:

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Protect Others After You Return Home
Step 3

When you return from your trip, you can’t forget about mosquito-borne illnesses just yet!

Many people who are infected with mosquito-borne illnesses don’t feel sick, but can still pass their infections on to mosquitoes that bite them. Others may feel fine while traveling, but start to feel sick after they return home. If you’ve been to an area with active transmission of a mosquito-borne disease, you should take steps to avoid mosquito bites for up to 3 weeks after you return home – even if you don’t feel sick:

Personal Protection from Mosquitoes
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Personal Protection from Mosquitoes

Don’t Bring Zika Home
Video

Don’t Bring Zika Home

Join California in the Fight Against Zika - Don’t Bring Zika Home

Top 5 Things You Should Know About Zika

  • Zika virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito and through unprotected sex with someone who is infected.  it can also spread from an infected pregnant woman to her developing baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth.
  • You are at risk if you or your sexual partner travel to areas with Zika, including Mexico.
  • A pregnant woman’s developing baby is at greatest risk of being harmed by the Zika vi

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