Blog

Overview

Blog

Publication

October 2016 District Report

In this month’s District Report: wildlife feeding, tick-borne disease surveillance results, and more.

Click here to read the October 2016 District Report.

Blog post

If You Care, Don’t Share!
10 Reasons You Shouldn't Feed Wild and Stray Animals

A raccoon sits upright and begs.

1. Wild animals don’t need your help.
Wild animals may show up looking for a handout, but they don’t really need help from humans to find food. Their natural diet is healthiest for them, and ‘human food’ can even make them sick.

Illustration of  New World screwworm fly captioned Cochliomyia hominivorax
Blog post

Screwworms: A Horror for Livestock

The Florida Keys, which had dengue outbreaks in 2009 and 2010 and recent cases of Zika virus, currently has a non-mosquito insect pest causing problems.  Detected in the lower Keys, screwworms have been locally acquired in the United States for the first time in over thirty yearsCochliomyia flies deposit maggots called “screwworms” on animals and those larvae can enter a body through an open wound and cause a potentially fatal infestation.  While the va

Press release

From California Department of Public Health: Health Officials Urge Californians to Remove Standing Water
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sacramento, CA – September28th, 2016

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith today called on the people of California to help reduce the number of mosquitoes by eliminating standing water, especially in areas that have recently had rain and continue to experience warm temperatures.

Blog post

World Rabies Day 2016

September 28th is the 10th annual World Rabies Day, an observance planned to raise awareness about rabies prevention worldwide.

Rabies is a viral disease that affects mammals, including wildlife, pets, and humans. It is most commonly transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Here in California rabies is mostly found in bats. Rabies infections in domestic animals, like cats and dogs, are sometimes diagnosed after a pet has been bitten or scratched by a wild animal like a skunk or fox.

Publication

September 2016 District Report

In this month’s District Report: Zika virus in Florida, bot flies, and more.

Click here to read the September 2016 District Report.

A group of scientists in white hazmat suits with air supply hoses cluster around a table.
Blog post

Your questions answered: what’s with the hazmat suits?

It looks like the famous scene from the movie ET: scientists in white suits with hoods descend from marked vehicles and begin doing…well, something. Nobody is quite sure what or why, but it looks scary!

Good news – although rodent-borne disease surveys might look like an alien invasion or toxic waste spill, there’s actually no risk to people passing by. In fact, visitors are always welcome to stop and watch at a safe distance, and there will usually be staff outside the caution zone available to answer questions.

So what’s with the hazmat suits?

An anesthetized wood rat is shown with a sore under its chin.
Blog post

Bot Flies

Only the least squeamish of people are not disturbed by a bot. This fly larva, of the family Oestridae, lives under a raised lesion on the skin, and can sometimes be felt wriggling as it develops. When the larva is ready to pupate, it crawls out of the skin to drop to the ground and continue its life cycle in the dirt. 

Press release

From California Department of Public Health: End of Summer Travelers Urged to Take Precautions to Prevent Zika
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sacramento, CA – August 19th, 2016

Travelers coming back from the Olympic Games in Rio and other vacation spots where the Zika virus is spreading are urged to take precautions upon return to help prevent the spread of the virus in California. While the virus is primarily transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, it can also pass from one person to another during sex.

A dead mosquito on a white background.
Blog post

Tips for Taking Detailed Insect Photos

Since we started reaching out to the public about reporting suspected invasive Aedes mosquito sightings, we’ve gotten a lot of mosquito photos in our email! That’s great, but insects - especially mosquitoes – are pretty small and they can be hard to identify in photos.

Publication

August 2016 District Report

In this month’s District Report: 2016 West Nile Virus Update.

Click here to read the August 2016 District Report.

Press release

From California Department of Public Health: CDPH Confirms First Human West Nile Virus Death of 2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sacramento, CA – August 5th, 2016

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith today announced the first confirmed death in California due to West Nile virus (WNV). The deceased person was a senior citizen in Sacramento County.

Press release

From California Department of Public Health: CDPH Reports Two Cases of Zika-Related Birth Defects in California
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sacramento, CA – August 4th, 2016

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) reported today that two infants with Zika-related microcephaly have been born in California to women who had Zika virus infections during pregnancy after spending time in a country where the virus is endemic. While mosquitoes that can carry the virus have been found in 12 California counties, there is no evidence these mosquitoes are transmitting Zika in the state at this time.

Press release

From California Department of Public Health: CDPH Reports Increased West Nile Virus Activity Statewide
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sacramento, CA – July 20, 2016

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is reporting increased West Nile virus activity across the state and is investigating numerous suspect cases in humans. While the first human case has not been confirmed by CDPH, a resident of Los Angeles County has symptoms consistent with West Nile virus disease. Initial tests on that patient indicate a probable West Nile virus diagnosis, which requires further testing for confirmation. 

Press release

Hantavirus Risk in San Mateo County
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Hantavirus Risk in San Mateo County

Burlingame, CA – July 14, 2016

San Mateo County Mosquito and Vector Control District continues to find evidence of hantavirus infection in deer mice collected during routine rodent-borne disease surveillance. The most recent samples were collected during May and June of 2016 in the vicinity San Bruno Mountain and Montara.

Publication

July 2016 District Report

In this month’s District Report: West Nile virus and birds, bed bug facts, and more.

Click here to read the July 2016 District Report.

Press release

Dead Birds are First Indication of West Nile Virus in San Mateo County in 2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Dead Birds are First Indication of West Nile Virus in San Mateo County in 2016

Burlingame, CA – July 7, 2016

Two dead American crows, one collected from Atherton and another collected from Redwood City, tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV) on July 6th. This is the first indication of the presence of WNV in San Mateo County in 2016.

Publication

June 2016 District Report

In this month’s District Report: stopping invasive Aedes, hantavirus prevention, and more.

Click here to read the June 2016 District Report.

Publication

May 2016 District Report

In this month’s District Report: World Malaria Day, avoiding mosquito bites, and more.

Click here to read the May 2016 District Report.

Commands